UTS Library

Copyright and Staff

Australian Copyright Law allows educational institutions to use certain copyright material for educational purposes without requiring permission from the copyright owner. Under two statutory licences (Part VA and Part VB), UTS staff can copy and communicate limited amounts of copyright material to students or other staff for a UTS educational course.

UTS also pays licence fees to collecting societies to support both the use of copyright material and the payment of royalties to copyright owners. The collecting societies include:

  • Screenrights, with whom we have a Part VA licence covering certain use of television and radio broadcasts
  • CAL (the Copyright Agency Limited) with whom we have a Part VB licence covering certain use of print and graphic material
  • a group of companies (ARIA, APRA-AMCOS and PPCA) with whom we have a licence that covers a range of music uses.

Using copyright material at work

There are conditions which apply when using other people's copyright material in your UTS work.

For guidance on these, see the fact sheet Staff Guide - Copyright at Work (PDF).

Using copyright works in teaching material

There are requirements and restrictions in using copyright works as part of teaching material.

For guidance on these, see the fact sheet Staff Guide - Copying for Educational Purposes (PDF).

For advice on using videos for teaching see Copyright Guidelines for Video Materials.

Copyright consideration for online teaching material

There are copyright considerations in providing teaching material electronically.

The Digital Resource Register (DRR) supports online teaching via UTSOnline and the Library’s eReadings Collection.

See

UTS ownership of teaching materials

The UTS Intellectual Property Policy (PDF) specifies the conditions for which UTS will retain ownership over certain types of material produced by UTS employees. These include commissioned work, creative work, scholarly work, and course and educational material.

How do I retain rights over my intellectual property?

Institutions around the world are now rapidly developing ways to showcase the scholarly output of their researchers, through tools like UTSePress. Almost all publishers accept the need to accommodate this change. Don't be afraid to negotiate with publishers up front to retain rights over your intellectual property - they will be dealing with this on a regular basis.

Check out the information available at the JISC site. It provides you with easy and practical alternatives to ensuring you retain your key rights.

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