UTS Library

“The Inevitable” by Kevin Kelly (and what it means for libraries), Part 1 of 2

I recently read The Inevitable by Kevin Kelly and was taken by his description of the technological forces busy shaping our future. I’ve given a couple of talks based on what I got out of this book and what some of these forces mean for libraries. Below are the slides I used in those talks and beneath them, some notes on what they mean for libraries. 

1. Becoming

  • Get used to constant change
  • Get used to our users or clients creating and making their own things
  • Big pointer to personalisation and anticipating user needs – but what are we doing about that in libraries – discovery & services?
  • Stop waiting for perfect before releasing new services – people understand that now.
  • Do we even notice what has happened when the changes are incremental. Can we do some of that ourselves?

2. Cognifying

  • In an age of robots and self-driving cars, what work will matter for us? How do we add real value?
  • There are more pointers here to providing deeper, richer and more personalised services for our clients.

3. Flowing

  • We need to stop relying on static collection growth and start providing just-in-time services and understand subscriptions better.
  • I think UTS ePRESS has already started experimenting with the fluidity of the page, edition, container and format, but maybe we can go even further with things like open peer-review, constant improvement, broader collaboration?
  • Maybe understanding how the stages of flowing impact on all media (towards being more open) is a new form of digital literacy.

4. Screening

  • Can we look at our libraries as a platform for cultural life within our communities and how do we do that effectively – finding more audiences and giving them a deeper, improved understanding with context for knowledge?

5. Accessing

  • Using without owning is a concept that actually comes from libraries, but maybe now it is being pushed even further through platform synergy. I guess with things like ILL and Bonus+ we are already there too, but perhaps these things can be massively improved and decentralised even further using new technologies and concepts – shared collections, single platform LMS, rethinking “membership”?

6. Sharing

  • I guess this relates heavily to #5 for libraries as it talks about more collaboration and then extreme decentralisation – maybe we need to get our act together and start thinking more imaginatively about how we do that.
  • Understanding how the “crowd” works and how we can participate in some of those crowd activities may well be increasingly important. Maybe we even become a bit of a hub for some crowd activities or movements?
End of Part 1. The image dredits are at the end of Part 2.