UTS Library

Book

When referencing a book in the Harvard UTS Style, you will need the following information about the book:

  • the author or authors of the book
  • the year the book was published
  • if the book has been edited, the editors names
  • the title of the book (in italics)
  • if there are several editions, the edition number
  • the name of the publisher
  • the place of publication

In most cases this information can be found either on the front cover of the book or within the first few pages or by checking the library catalogue. Once you have collected this information you will need to arrange it as shown below. Roll the mouse over each section for a description of the information.

Davinson, D.E. 1977, Theses and dissertations as information sources, C. Bingley, London.

Chissick, M. & Kelman, A. 2002, Electronic commerce : law and practice, 3rd edn, Sweet & Maxwell, London.

For more information about referencing a book please expand any of the options below. You can also get help with referencing at any time via the Ask a Librarian page.

Authors

One author

In text

(Allen 1973), (Davinson 1977)

Reference list

Allen, G.R. 1973, The graduate students' guide to theses and dissertations: a practical manual for writing and research, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

More than one author

In text

If there are two authors use an ampersand symbol between their names: (Ashima & Hogue 2006)

If there are three use the ampersand symbol before the last author surname: (Butler, Severino & Guerra 1997)

If there are four or more authors, list just the first author, followed by 'et al.': (Olysen et al. 2003)

Reference list (using these three examples. Note that in the reference list all authors must be listed even if there are four or more)

Ashima, A. & Hogue, A. 2006, Writing academic English, 4th edn, Pearson Longman, White Plains, NY.

Butler, J.E., Severino, C. & Guerra, J.C. 1997, Writing in multicultural settings, Modern Language Association of America, New York.

Olysen, B., Patching, R., Oakham, K.M. & Sedorkin, G. 2003, Reporting in a multimedia world, Allen & Unwin Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW.


No author

In text

(Maximum Linux security: a hacker's guide to protecting your Linux server and workstation 1999)

Reference list

Maximum Linux security: a hacker's guide to protecting your Linux server and workstation 1999, Prentice Hall, Hemel Hempstead, UK.

Organisation as an author

In text

(Mueller Associates & United States Department of Energy 1978)

Reference list

Mueller Associates & United States Deptartment of Energy 1978, Status of alcohol fuels utilization technology for highway transportation, Dept of Energy, Washington, D.C.

Foreword with a different author

In text

Price said 'times were tough' (Spencer 2012, p. 4)

Price in her foreword to The neon jockey said 'times were tough' (Spencer 2012, p .4)

Reference list

Spencer, T. 2012, The neon jockey, Alabaster Press, Windhoek.

Quote from a work citing another author

Sometimes a work you are using quotes a work from another author. For example, on page 78 of a book by Thorne, written in 1994, you find a quote from a 1906 paper by Albert Einstein. To cite the work by Einstein you should mention Einstein's paper in the text and use Thorne as your in-text reference, with page number. nThere are many ways you could do this. Here are three examples:

Einstein stated in 1906 that 'time is relative' (Thorne 1994, p. 78).

Thorne (1994, p. 78) quotes Einstein as saying in 1906 that 'time is relative'.

The theory that 'time is relative' was first stated by Einstein in 1906 (Thorne 1994, p. 78).

In your reference list you must have the full reference for Thorne. If you wish, you may also include the reference for Einstein (you can get this from Thorne's bibliography), but this isn't normally recommended because you haven't actually consulted the Einstein paper directly.

Translation or Adaptation from an original

If referencing a translation or adaptation, use the publication details of the translation or adaptation (such as the year and place of publication, and the publisher), not the details of the original work.

If you have used the work in its original language, reference it with the original language details including the spelling conventions of the original language. If you wish you can add a translation of the title in parentheses (see the first Baudelaire example below).

In text

(Baudelaire 2004), (Baudelaire 2008), (Marquez 1998), (O'Brien 2008)

Reference list

Baudelaire, C.P. 2004, Les fleurs du mal (Flowers of evil), Gallimard, Paris.

Baudelaire, C.P. 2008, The flowers of evil, trans. J.N. McGowan, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Marquez, G.G. 1998, One hundred years of solitude, trans. G. Rabassa, Perennial Classics, New York.

O’Brien, P.G. 2008, ‘Health history and physical examination’, in D. Brown, H. Edwards & S.M Lewis (eds), Lewis's medical-surgical nursing: assessment and management of clinical problems, 2nd edn, adapted by J. Thompson, Elsevier, Marrickville, NSW, pp. 36-62.

The year of the reference is the year of publication of the translation or adaption, not of the original.

Edited book

One editor

In text

(Hamilton 2005)

Reference list

Hamilton, P. (ed.) 2005, Visual research methods, vol. 4, Sage, London.

More than one editor

In text

(Turner & Roth 2003)

Note for in text referencing, if there are four or more editors, list just the first editor, followed by et al.

Reference list

Turner, S.P. & Roth, P.A. (eds) 2003, Blackwell guide to the philosophy of the social sciences, Blackwell, Oxford.

Chapter within a print Edited Book

In text

(Coleman 2003), (Riddick-Thomas 2009)

Reference list

Coleman, S. 2003, 'Democracy in an e-connected world', in R. Davidson (ed.), The e-connected world: risks and opportunities McGill Queens University Press, Montreal, pp. 125-32.

Riddick-Thomas, N.M. 2009, 'Ethics in midwifery', in D.M. Fraser & M.A. Cooper (eds), Myles textbook for midwives, 15th edn, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, pp. 55-66.

Tips and Tricks

Use this format for a chapter within an edited book, where each chapter of the book has its own author and its own title.

If an electronic book chapter has an equivalent printed version, reference it as if it was the print version. Otherwise, use the chapter from online book format below.

In the examples, note the word 'in' in front of the editor names, and also that the editor initials come in front of their surnames, unlike the author initials which come after their surnames. Use (ed.) for one editor, (eds) for more than one editor.

In some textbooks, chapters are grouped together into Units, with unit editors, and some chapters have no listed authors. In such a case, use the chapter author if there is one, and otherwise use the unit editor in place of the author (see first example below). If a chapter has been adapted, and so has both authors and an adaptor, list the adaptor's name after the chapter title (see second example below),

White, J. 2009, 'Nursing today', in J. Crisp & C. Taylor (eds), Potter & Perry's fundamentals of nursing, 3rd edn, Elsevier Australia, Chatswood, NSW, pp. 1-15.

Robbins, N.C., Shaw, C.A. & Lewis, S.L. 2012, 'Nursing management: diabetes mellitus', adapted by B. Davis, in D. Brown & H. Edwards (eds), Lewis's medical-surgical nursing: assessment and management of clinical problems, 3rd edn, Elsevier Australia, Chatswood, NSW, pp. 1357-92.

Online or electronic book

There are three possibilities here:

  1. The online or electronic book is has the same structure and page numbering as the equivalent print version, for example if the book is in pdf format. In this case, reference it as the print version.
  2. The online book is essentially a website and is significantly different from the print version, or there is no print version. In this case, reference it like a website. The publisher and place of publication now refer to the producer or host of the online version, and the city where the host is based (this can be left out if not clear). You must also include the date you viewed the book online, followed by the full URL within angle brackets.
  3. The electronic book is on an ereader, such as Kindle. In this case reference it similarly to a print book (see the Martin example below) with the words 'electronic book' directly after the title. Get the book's citation details from the page after the title page, or by using the 'Copyright' link in the table of contents, or from the site from which you downloaded the book, or as a last resort from Google. You don't need to put the place of publication if this is not clear. Do not put a URL or the type of reader.

In text

This is the same for all three cases (using the reference list examples below): (Black 2008), (Kim 2000), (Martin 2003).

If you need a page number in text (eg if you are quoting from the book) then in the three cases:

  1. Use the page numbers from the electronic book, eg (Black, 2008, p. 14).
  2. Use chapter and/or paragraph numbers (abbreviate to 'para.'), eg (Kim 2000, chapter 1, para. 5). If your book is an online graphic novel with no page numbers, and you wish to quote from a specific panel, use chapter and/or panel numbers, eg (Spiegelman , 2011, chapter 2, panel 3).
  3. This is tricky as most readers can re-size pages, which changes the numbering. However at the bottom of the page you should see both the page number and the total number of pages (these are sometimes called locations). Use the ratio of these two numbers, eg (Martin 2003, p. 83/10893). Use p. even if the reader uses locations.

Reference list (these are examples of the each of the three possibilities)

Black, A. 2008, The West and Islam: religion and political thought in world history, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Kim, A.J. 2000, Community building on the web, Safari Books Online, Boston, viewed 1 June 2009, <http://proquest.safaribooksonline.com/0201874849>

Martin, G.R.R. 2003, Game of thrones, electronic book, Harper Voyager, London.

Chapter within a online or electronic edited book

We have the same three possibilities as for an online or electronic book:

  1. The online or electronic book is has the same structure and page numbering as the equivalent print version, for example if the book is in pdf format. In this case, reference your chapter as the print version.
  2. The online book is essentially a website and is significantly different from the print version, or there is no print version. In this case, reference your chapter like a website. The publisher and place of publication now refer to the producer or host of the online version, and the city where the host is based (this can be left out if not clear). You must also include the date you viewed the book online, followed by the full URL within angle brackets. You don't need to put any chapter page numbers.
  3. The electronic book is on an ereader, such as Kindle. In this case reference your chapter similarly to a print book chapter (see the Lloyd example below) with the words 'electronic book' directly after the book title. Get the book's citation details from the page after the title page, or by using the 'Copyright' link in the table of contents, or from the site from which you downloaded the book, or as a last resort from Google. You don't need to put the place of publication if this is not clear. Do not put a URL or the type of reader. Getting the page numbers for a chapter in an ebook reader is tricky as most readers can re-size pages, which changes the numbering. However at the bottom of each page you should see both the page number and the total number of pages (these are sometimes called locations). Use the ratio of the chapter page numbers and the total number (see the Lloyd example below, where the 75-119 are the chapter page numbers and 605 is the total number of pages). Use pp. even if the reader uses locations.

In text

This is the same for all cases (using the reference list examples below):

(Odih & Knights 2000), (Lloyd 2006)

If you need to insert page numbers in text, to reference a quotation for example, follow the examples in the online or electronic book section above.

Reference list (these are examples of the two possibilities - note that in a true reference list these would be listed in alphabetical order by first author surname)

Odih, P. & Knights, D. 2000, 'Just in time?', in J.R. Bryson, P.W. Daniels, N. Henry & J. Pollard (eds), Knowledge, space, economy, Routledge, London, pp. 96-117.

Lloyd, C. 2006, 'Race and ethnicity', in M. Cook & G. Davie (eds), Modern France: society in transition, electronic book, Routledge, London, pp. 75-119/605.

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