UTS Library

Deposit

Deposit means to self-archive your work in an institutional or subject repository, also known as Green OA. Its purpose is to maximise online accessibility to your research, therefore increasing its use and impact.

Institutional Repositories

  • are digital collections of research outputs from a university
  • showcase the research of an institution
  • help to ensure that research is widely disseminated and searchable on the web
  • include the UTS institutional repository

Subject Repositories

  • are also known as central or discipline repositories
  • include research outputs from a range of institutions in a subject or discipline area
  • ensure research is widely disseminated and searchable on the web
  • include Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central

Deposit your research outputs in OPUS, the UTS institutional repository, to comply with the UTS Open Access Policy and maximise the impact of your work.

Depositing your research in OPUS has many benefits in ensuring the widest possible readership for your research, as well as increasing its impact.

  • Enables access to your research as soon as possible, regardless of where you choose to publish (see Access Levels under the OPUS tab)
  • Feeds into your research profile on your Academic/Centre/Faculty web page
  • Complies with the UTS Open Access Policy
  • Complies with the existing Open Access mandates of leading research funding bodies (e.g, ARC and NHMRC)
  • Enables UTS to capture and report its research activity to the Australian government
  • Free to use for both authors and readers of research
  • Contains high quality metadata that allows for greater discoverability, as well as indexing by search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster and Trove
  • Each item deposited has a permanent URL assigned to it and is preserved for the future, regardless of your employment location

OPUS (Open Publications of UTS Scholars) is the UTS institutional repository. It showcases the research of UTS staff and postgraduate students to a global audience. For you, as a researcher, OPUS increases the visibility and accessibility of your research by making it openly available regardless of where you choose to publish.

Items in OPUS are enhanced with high quality metadata and seeded to search engines such as Google Scholar as well as being linked to your UTS research profile, increasing discoverability and opportunities for citation of your work and collaboration. In addition, works in OPUS are preserved for long-term access and discovery.

The UTS Open Access Policy requires UTS research outputs to be openly available via OPUS. Depositing your work in OPUS also assists you in complying with ARC, NHMRC and other funder Open Access policies. Providing Open Access to your research outputs through OPUS not only ensures you comply with these important policies, but increases opportunities for other researchers to cite and build upon your work.

OPUS archives UTS research submitted for Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) and Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA). It also stores digital theses and forms of scholarship that do not usually see formal publication.

How can you deposit works in OPUS?

When you claim (or enter) your research in Symplectic Elements, simply upload a copy of your work which can be made openly available. Symplectic provides information on which version of your work to upload. If you are unsure, please supply a copy of the Accepted Manuscript version. Ensure you check the box to “agree to the OPUS license terms”.

Once uploaded, your works are automatically sent to OPUS and placed temporarily in Closed Access until reviewed by UTS Library staff.

  • Library staff check to ensure compliance with copyright and publisher agreements
  • If the version you supplied cannot be hosted in OPUS you may receive an email requesting a copy of the Accepted Manuscript

Once items are cleared of copyright constraints and/or publisher embargoes, your work is moved to Open Access and made accessible to the public.

Instructions are available from the Symplectic User Guide (PDF) or contact opus@uts.edu.au for further information.

What are Subject Repositories?

  • also known as central or discipline repositories
  • include research outputs from a range of institutions in a subject or discipline area
  • ensure research is widely disseminated and searchable on the web
  • examples include Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and PubMed Central

Finding a Repository

Depositing your papers in a Subject Repository

  • Ensure you have permission from your publisher by:
    • Checking your publisher agreement
    • Checking the Sherpa/Romeo database of publisher permissions
  • Ensure you are depositing the correct version. Publisher agreements may allow you to deposit:
    • Submitted Manuscript: paper before peer review
    • Accepted Manuscript: paper after peer-review, with revisions included
    • Published Version: paper formatted for publication


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