UTS Library

New books by UTS Authors

Highlighting some recent additions to our collection by UTS authors and editors.
To find works by UTS authors, refine your search using the menu on the left hand side in the Catalogue by Special Collections > UTS Authors.

Sydney Noir

Editor
John Dale, Professor, Creative Writing Program, University of Technology Sydney

Authors Kirsten Tranter, Mandy Sayer (Doctorate of Creative Arts - UTS), Eleanor Limprecht (Doctorate of Creative Arts and a Masters of Writing and Lecturer, Creative Writing- UTS), Mark Dapin, Leigh Redhead, Julie Koh, Peter Polites , Robert Drewe, Tom Gilling, Gabrielle Lord, Philip McLaren, P.M. Newton (Librarian - UTS), Peter Doyle

Description - The Akashic ‘Noir’ crime series began in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. The book earned so much attention and acclaim that it has now expanded to include over 50 titles in locales criss-crossing the globe. The incorporation of familiar, well-known locations with excellent writing and plotting is a winning combination that readers can’t resist. Those who have stepped into the ring to edit the collections run the gamut from little-known talents to big names like Joyce Carol Oates and Dennis Lehane.

In 2018, Brio will co-publish the first-ever Australian title in the series, Sydney Noir, featuring fourteen brand-new stories from some of our very best writers: Mandy Sayer, John Dale, Mark Dapin, Kirsten Tranter, Eleanor Limprecht, Leigh Redhead, Robert Drewe, Julie Koh, Peter Polites, Tom Gilling, Gabrielle Lord, Philip McLaren, P.M. Newton and Peter Doyle. The stories deal with men and women who work in finance or serve in Liquorland, drive cabs or beat-up utes. They might be architects or struggling students, athletes or Aboriginal liaison officers, retired coppers or contract labourers, patternmakers or photographers, philosophy lecturers or drug dealers. Some are desperate for revenge or money and fame; others are simply caught up in circumstances beyond their control or in a sexual relationship gone wrong.

The reader is taken from Kings Cross to La Perouse, from Balmain to Parramatta, Redfern to Maroubra, Clovelly to Bankstown, Sydney Harbour to Edgecliff, Newtown to Ashfield, and Lavender Bay to Mosman. There are no safe spaces in this collection. What Sydney Noir does best is to provide a window onto the street. Sit back and enjoy the view. 

Run For Your Life

Author
Bob Carr, Director, Australia-China Relations Institute and Professor, University of Technology Sydney 

Description - Tearing up the rules on political memoirs

Most Political memoirs are boring.

Bob Carr tears up the rules. He plunges in, beginning with the despair of a young man pining for a political career, convinced he's going nowhere, then vaulting to the exhilaration of a premier who, on one day, saves a vast forest and unveils the country's best curriculum.

He lashes himself for ignoring a cry from a prisoner in a cell and for a breach of protocol with a US Supreme Court. He considers talking to the leader of a notorious rape gang and celebrates winning power against the odds: a leader without kids or any interest in sport.

He describes growing up in a fibro house without sewerage and a 'lousy education' that produced a lifetime appetite for self-learning. He is candid about dealing with the media, dining with royals, working for Kerry Packer.

He reveals the secrets he learnt from Neville Wran. He is open about his adulation of Gough Whitlam. Floating above all is Bob Carr's idea of public service in a party, he says, that resembles an old, scarred, barnacled whale.

In an era of bland politicians, here's one with personality true to his quirky self.

Silence the jet skis! Balance the budget! Liberate the dolphins! Roll out the toll roads! Declare a million hectares of eucalypt wilderness! Be a politician of character.

All author proceeds from this book are donated to help the children displaced by the Syrian civil war by funding humanitarian aid through the registered charity Australia for UNHCR. 

Magic

Author
Jan Golembiewski, Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney

Description - This is a true story ...A young man heads off on a journey to find out if magic still exists in the world, to know its wonder, and to see if it might save him when his own life is unexpectedly at stake.

Instead of retreating after being deported from Mexico, or beaten up in Guatemala, he travels to the Caribbean where he meets a Rastafarian Don Juan who teaches him about the 'natural mystic;' a magical tradition that had travelled to the Caribbean centuries earlier with the slavery trade. Fate further propels his travels through the Americas and Europe to locate the source of this esoteric knowledge in Mother Africa, where his emerging mastery of mysticism is tested by the Sahara desert. He is imprisoned in Nigeria, and tortured, and then sold as a slave.

Magic is the story of an incredible journey, both physical and spiritual, that reverberates with literary voice and authenticity: the uniqueness of lived adventure and of a passionate heart and vision.

Gentrification and Displacement : The Forced Relocation of Public Housing Tenants in Inner-Sydney

Authors
Alan Morris, Professor, Institute for Public Policy and Governance, University of Technology Sydney

Description- This book examines the forced displacement of public housing residents in Sydney’s Millers Point and The Rocks communities. It considers the strategies deployed by the government to pressure tenants to move, and the social and personal impacts of the displacement on the residents themselves.

Drawing on in-depth interviews with tenants alongside government and media communications, the Millers Point case study offers a penetrating and moving analysis of gentrification and displacement in one of Australia’s oldest and more unique working class and public housing neighbourhoods. Gentrification and Displacement  advances work in urban studies by charting trends in urban renewal and displacement, furthering our understanding of public housing, gentrification and the effects of forced relocation on vulnerable urban communities.

Whatever Happened to the Leisure Society?

Author
Anthony James Veal, Adjunct Professor, The Dean's Unit, University of Technology

Description- The idea of a ‘leisure society’ was in its heyday in the 1960s and 1970s, when it was predicted that the pattern of falling working hours which had been experienced in Western societies in the first half of the twentieth century would continue indefinitely. The leisure society has clearly not been realised. On the contrary: contemporary industrial societies seem to be characterised by a shortage of time, experienced as ‘time squeeze’ and stress. The leisure society idea can be seen as the modern version of the age-old dream of a ‘life of ease and plenty’.

This analytically and empirically rich book traces the idea in history, through biblical, classical Greek, medieval and nineteenth century utopian writings and into twentieth century concerns with dystopia and the impact of rapid technological change. The ‘leisure society’ concept turns out to have been an elusive and short-lived phenomenon. For a variety of reasons, the trend towards shorter working hours ran out of steam in the last quarter of the twentieth century. However, while leisure scholars have deserted the topic, a diverse range of activists, including environmentalists, economists and feminists, continue to make the case for reducing working hours. Whatever Happened to the Leisure Society? concludes that the on-going ‘struggle for time’ should be supported, for the sake of human health and well-being and for the sake of the planet.

This is a valuable resource for students and academics in the fields of leisure studies, cultural studies, history, economics, sociology and political science.

Electronic version


UTS Library is dedicated to collecting the books of UTS Authors. If we have missed adding anything published in the last 2 years by UTS staff, students or alumni, please let us know by emailing Merrillie Redden.